Tsavo National Park, Safaris, Lodges and tented Camps in Tsavo East and West
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    Patterson’s Safari Camp Tsavo Park Kenya & Pattersons Tented Camp Africa

    Patterson's Safari Camp is small but exclusive safari camp and is best suited for tsavo safaris from Mombasa due to the nearness of the Mombassa. The Patterson's Safari Camp Tsavo is located in the massive Tsavo National Park; the Tsavo Patterson's Safari Camp has its own private 18 Km stretch of wooded valley through which the Galana River flows as the river is right on your doorstep. In the evenings one can sit on the 'beach terrace' which located 10m from the waters of the river from here you can watch hippos as they laze in the water and listen to their snorts when they argue with each other, crocodiles too are abound especially the infamous 'giants' of the Tsavo River. In the dark the guards at Patterson's Camp are equipped with powerful spotlights and are always very keen to show visitors animals coming down to the river to drink water, you might even be one of the lucky ones and get to see a leopard lapping up the water as he keeps a nervous watch on the nearby crocs, there are hundreds of red elephants here as well as numerous other animals, the bush is permeated by the lovely call of the yellow billed hornbill. Patterson’s Safari Camp is the perfect escape for an extended bush stay, a stop en route in your safari or an overnight bush break from the beaches of the Kenya coast.

     

    The Tsavo Patterson's Tented Camp features 20 en suite tents, all with spacious verandahs offering views of the river, the eco-friendly design provides a low impact, truly natural experience without the need to sacrifice comfort, each tent is fully furnished with one king or two single beds, On advanced request to our reservation team, an additional bed can be added to make a triple accommodating a child sharing or third adult, the tents have solar generated electricity for lighting and a covered verandah with chairs and tables, the tents are permanently built on raised cement foundations and a thatched roof provides additional protection as well as natural cooling, All beds at Pattersons Safari Camp come with mosquito nets and all house-keeping chores are arranged when you are away game viewing. Alternate to game viewing is to bring a book, kick back and relax; listen to the chirps and sounds of the wild. there is also a shaded seating area near the reception as well as a fully stocked bar serving a variety of popular beverages and hot drinks plus, all tents face the Arthi River with the backdrop of the Yatta Plateau, the world’s longest lava flow formed from the Ol Doinyo Sabuk Mountain which runs 290km along the western boundary of the National Park above the Arthi River. All tents are surrounded by riverine vegetation, which is maintained in its natural state and is where animals come to feed. Hippo and elephant dung are often seen together with footprints near the tents. Tsavo East is one of the last remaining wilderness and biodiversity strongholds on earth. There is an abundance of wildlife around the Pattersons Camp including lions, buffaloes, elephants and the occasional resident leopard, one of the prize sightings on a tsavo safari. You might also be lucky enough to see the elusive black rhino, one of the world’s rarest animals which are threatened with extinction. Impalas, waterbucks, Lesser Kudu, and giraffes also abound. The Tsavo Park is renowned for its spectacular variety of different bird species, making it a bird watchers’ paradise. Guests wishing to book a walking safari within the Pattersons safari Camp vicinity are advised do so only when accompanied by our authentic Maasai guards to ensure their safety. The river is teeming with our resident hippos and crocodiles, which have made themselves very much at home, Pattersons safari Camp Tsavo meals are served in the dining hall where the internationally-trained chef prepares a variety of freshly-cooked, mouth watering cuisine and delicious vegetarian options. The restaurant serves English and Continental breakfasts and international cuisine, prepared from fresh, locally grown produce, enjoy a sundowner along the banks of the Athi River and soak up the tranquil atmosphere, let the sounds of Africa take over as you listen to the therapeutic waters gurgling past and the punctuating rhythms of insects and tree frogs. Meals are held in the Tsavo Pattersons safari Camp main dining hall, where fresh foods are served daily. Special Bush Dinners and Breakfast are popular especially with honeymooners; Bush Dinners require notice before arrival.

     

    Patterson's Camp Tsavo has been set up in an area of historical significance and the site of one of Africa’s most celebrated adventure stories, this is where two nine-foot long lions, known by the locals as Man Eaters of Tsavo and told in the movie The Ghost and Darkness, used to roam around at the end of the Nineteenth Century looking for human prey, devouring up to 140 railway workers in the process until they were shot by the camps namesake the courageous Colonel John Patterson, who was in charge of building the railroad bridge across the Tsavo river. While driving to the Tsavo Patterson's Camp, you will pass the railway track and bridge that featured prominently in the box office hit: The Ghost and the Darkness descendants of the man-eating lions of Tsavo continue to inspire fear. Patterson's Tented Camp is built on a site where the original railway workers worked to run the line up to Kisumu, legend has it that many of the workers (mostly imports from India) were mauled or eaten by lions here, Lieutenant Colonel J H Patterson was an Indian army officer with long experience in railway construction who was sent to build a bridge over the Tsavo River with the expectation that he would be all done in four to five months time, a year went by, however before the bridge was ready for traffic. This was mainly thanks to the lions that kept terrorizing the workers and thereby delaying work. Pair of lions - a male and his mate (relatively named Ghost & Darkness respectively) - were particularly notorious and gained the sort of notoriety customarily reserved for the dragons of medieval legend. In his killing them, Patterson emerged from the duel as something of a nineteenth century St. George. Patterson's Tented Camp Tsavo is named in memory of those days long gone. Pattersons Camp prides itself of being Tsavo's best-kept secret. Pattersons Safari Camp can be accessed from Nairobi by driving past the nearest town, Mtito Andei and entering the park through the entrance opposite the Tsavo River Gate (approximately 290 km from Nairobi). From Mombasa, drive past Voi and the small town of Manyani. You will see the park entrance on the left hand side, after the small town of Manyani (approximately 233 km from Mombasa). The Patterson Camp staffs are very helpful, polite and ready to go out of their way to make your stay special.

     

    Pattersons Safari Camp Tsavo Accommodation

     

    Pattersons Safari Camp comprises of 20 spacious en suite tents. Each tent is fully furnished with one king or two single beds. Accommodation is in luxury tents built on a concrete base. These tents give you the feeling of camping in the wilds of Africa while at the same time being extremely comfortable, on advanced request; an additional bed can be added to make a triple accommodating a child sharing or third adult. There are also family tents that can take a maximum party of 8 in comfort. There is also a small porch/veranda with seats and a coffee table; Tents have solar generated electricity for lighting and a covered verandah with chairs and tables. The tents are permanently built on raised cement foundations and a thatched roof provides additional protection as well as natural cooling. There is also a shaded seating area near the reception as well as a fully licensed bar serving a variety of popular beverages and a restaurant serving three daily meals featuring international cuisine prepared from fresh local Kenya meat and produce. All tents face the Arthi River with the backdrop of the Yatta Plateau, the world’s longest lava flow formed from the Ol Doinyo Sabuk Mountain which runs 290km along the western boundary of the National Park above the Arthi River. All tents are surrounded by riverine vegetation, which is maintained in its natural state and is where animals come to feed. Hippo and elephant dung are often seen together with footprints near the tents. all house keeping chores are arranged when you are away game viewing. Alternate to game viewing is to bring a book, kick back and relax; listen to the chirps and sounds of the wild. The Athi, Galana, and Tsavo rivers are "right there" making it a fast ride to watch the parade of animals lining up to quench their thirst.

     

    Pattersons Safari Camp Meals

     

    All meals at Patterson Safari Camp are prepared at the camp from fresh local produce and a selection of meat from local farms and seafood from the Indian Ocean and Lake Victoria. Dishes vary each day and there is always a vegetarian selection. Patterson Camp is happy to cater to specific dietary needs with advance notice, depending on the conditions; breakfast may be served at the edge of the river. Lunch is usually informal and many guests choose to eat under the shade of the many trees in the Patterson Camp Tsavo central area. Dinner is served in our spacious dining room, our fully licensed bar offers soft drinks, fresh juice, cold Kenyan's beer, a selection of imported wines and popular spirits and perhaps you might try one of our famous cocktails. An emphasis is placed on the experience of dining in the wild. Although meals are provided in a covered restaurant and drinks in a traditional bar, visitors are kept very close to the action by providing large, open areas with seats and tables on them. In this way you are always right there in the wild. Grab a drink and spill out onto the terrace, look up at the wonderful night sky. Recline in a seat by the fire or retire to a quiet moment on your tent porch ... it's all available at Patterson Safari Camp

     

    Patterson's Safari Camp Game Viewing and Activities

     

    Tsavo East is one of the last remaining wilderness and biodiversity strongholds on earth. There is an abundance of wildlife around the camp, including lions, buffaloes, elephants and the occasional resident leopard, one of the prize sightings on a safari. You might also be lucky enough to see the elusive black rhino, one of the world’s rarest animals which is threatened with extinction. Impalas, waterbucks, Lesser Kudu, and giraffes also abound. The park is renowned for its spectacular variety of different bird species, making it a bird watchers’ paradise. Guests wishing to walk within the camp vicinity are advised do so only when accompanied by our authentic Maasai guards to ensure their safety. The river is teeming with our resident hippos and crocodiles, which have made themselves very much at home and are highly visible.

     

    Tsavo National Park Kenya Information

     

    Tsavo National Park is a rolling volcanic savannah punctuated by deep springs and lava fields, with acacia trees shading agama lizards from the sun, while it’s true that delays here offer the chance to take in a starkly beautiful landscape, they also allow a traveler to ponder one curious detail the website neglects to mention. Though the exact figure is contested, the railroad across Tsavo River has an intriguing and grisly past. It’s a warm December night in 1898, and tensions in Tsavo are running high. Africans and Indians, in Kenya to help construct a rail bridge under the direction of Colonel John Patterson, huddle by firelight in a boma, a crudely constructed enclosure of knitted thorns. For nine months now, workers have been disappearing. The Ghost and the Darkness, as the two beasts have come to be called, shadow the Patterson Safari Camp with brutal, leonine efficiency. Whatever they want, they take. All frantic attempts to thwart the siege have failed, including the boma, beneath which they slink like foxes into a chicken coop. The Africans and Indians try to sleep, recovering strength for another day of work as their bridge inches across the river – but how do you sleep when death stalks the savannah? Recalling nights like this in his classic memoir, Patterson writes that more than once a Lion burst into the midst of the terrified group, seized an unfortunate wretch amid the cries and shrieks of his companions, and dragged him off through the thick thorn fence’’. Again and again, either singly or as a team, the male lions effortlessly took their victim of choice. The modern tsavo safari traveller might make a mental connection between the Tsavo outside and these infamous ‘‘Maneaters of Tsavo’’, immortalised in legends, video games and a Michael Douglas movie (with the risible tagline ‘‘Prey for the hunters’’) since Patterson’s account was published in 1907. They might even wonder where the original rail bridge is located; or where the old lions’ den, a virtual morgue, lies tucked away in the twin national parks. But then the train jolts into life, rumbling off to Mombasa and other African tales. This Tsavo trip owes a huge debt to the fallen, but there’s little time to pause. Tsavo West, more than most holidays destinations in the world offers a thrillingly tactile experience. Dirt roads relay the texture of the earth through the shuddering compartment of a safari truck; dust settles on clammy skin.

     

    There are a number of accommodations in Tsavo West, though none seem more appropriate than Patterson Safari Camp given the spirit of this safari expedition. Famously characterised in Isak Dinesen’s Out of Africa (and played by Robert Redford in the 1985 film), Denys Finch Hatton walked between two worlds, equally at ease in the African wilderness and in the porcelain and crystal world of colonial society. As an established camp clustered around a hippo-inhabited lagoon, Patterson Safari Camp takes inspiration from the man, presenting white tablecloths, portmanteaus and chess sets even as dangerous buffalo wander across its footpaths. Fine dining is followed by a harrowing moment when, returning to your tent, the shadows in front of you churn to life – a crocodile bellies into the lagoon as a guard sporting a bow and arrow springs to your defense. This continent of Africa has a terribly strong sense of sarcasm’’. You set out in search of the man-eaters’ story early next morning. The 1898 rail bridge site is more than 100 kilometers away across a rough landscape that changes colour with startling abruptness. Dry acacias decorated with bauble-like nests give way to yellow-fever trees as you rumble through oases. Baboons scatter before the truck. Rocky buttes alternate alongside the road with termite nests as tall as a man. Tsavo River Gate, a prominent entrance to the national park, opens on to a busy highway. You leave the truck here and continue on foot safaris, with a ranger to show you the way. The old bridge site, across the road and partly along train tracks, is largely there. The Mombasa to Uganda railroad (it continues beyond Nairobi) crosses a new bridge over the Tsavo River, which rendered the old one obsolete. The ranger points out the position of its original pylons, but all are mud and confused animal footprints now, with murky water rushing down from Mzima Springs. Any echo of the Ghost and the Darkness has long since faded; when they killed the workers the lions carried them very easily – and very far. There are several plaques here detailing the story of the man eaters, but more notable are the skeletal branches, the mounds of dried palms, the zebra skulls half-buried in red mud. Colonel Patterson eventually killed the two lions. He had their skins turned into floor rugs, which he walked over for more than 25 years before selling them in 1924 to the Chicago Field Museum for $US5000.

     

    The museum reconstructed the bodies and put them on public display, where they remain today – maneless, like male Tsavo lions characteristically are, though slightly smaller than their original size following decades of neglect. When Patterson shot the lions, both were about 2.7 metres in length. DNA testing has confirmed their grisly diet, though the museum contests the number of men actually killed. On your drive back to Patterson Safari Camp you stop at the Shetani lava caves, hidden in a wrinkled wasteland of solidified magma. Shetani is the Swahili word for ‘‘devil’’; locals believed that the flowing lava was the devil walking at night. The caves are filled with the foetid smell of resident bats. It reminds you that the Africa today is very different from the one seen by Colonel Patterson, or even Finch Hatton, in the first decades of the 20th century. These days, there are far greater monsters around than a pair of man-eating lions.

     

    Patterson Safari Camp has comfortable (and safe) raised tents with en suite bathrooms and hot running water, in Tsavo West National Park. Six-course meals mean nobody goes hungry on safari (which is also catered). The Maneaters’ Den is close to Tsavo River Gate and can be reached on a game drive or with the direction of a hired ranger. To find the Shetani lava caves, a ranger should be hired for a small fee at Chyulu Gate. The small mountain behind the caves can be climbed for views across the lava fields. Mzima Springs is an astonishing site and miniature ecosystem. Nile crocodiles and hippos can be seen from a submarine viewing chamber. Watch the sun set over Mount Kilimanjaro with sundowners and appetizers arranged by Patterson Safari Camp.

     

    Tsavo West National Park

     

    Tsavo West, stretching from the Chyulu Hills to the Tanzanian border, is the smaller of the two parks and is also more developed, especially in the northern sector between the Tsavo River and the Mombasa highway, where a couple of large safari lodges are situated. The main attraction here are the crystal clear waters of Mzima Springs, where you can follow a trail through the fever trees to observe hippos and attendant shoals of barbel from a unique underwater hide. The landscape of Tsavo West is an ever-changing mosaic of grassy plains and woodlands broken by stark volcanic cones, ridges and lava flows that make game viewing more difficult but also more rewarding. Animals to look for include buffalo, leopard, lesser kudu, and fringe-eared oryx. There are black rhinos, too, confined to a 62 sq km sanctuary at Ngulia where they are safer from poaching.

     

    Tsavo West National park is located on south eastern Kenya, 240km from Nairobi along the western side of Mombasa-Nairobi highway. It took us almost 4 hours to get there from Nairobi. This is the only road from Nairobi to Mombasa, so the drive was quite stressing. The park has many attractions as Recent Volcanoes, lava flows and caves with potential for geological and cave exploration and hiking. Mzima Springs & underwater hippo and fish watching. Wildlife in the park is also rich and consists of Leopard, Cheetah, Wild dogs, Buffalo, Rhino, Elephant, Giraffe, Zebra, Lion, Crocodile, Mongoose, Hyrax, Dik- dik, Lesser Kudu, and Nocturnal Porcupine. Prolific birdlife features 600 species. Tsavo is also unique whopping 21,000 square kilometers of wilderness.

     

    It comprises Tsavo East, West and Chyulu National Parks. It is Africa's largest wildlife protected area, larger than the land of Israel. “Full of wild beasts, such as rhinoceros, buffaloes and elephants” from a missionary’s diary written in 1849. Later in 1900 the notorious “Man Eaters of Tsavo” man-eating lions preyed on the railway linesman building the great Uganda Railway in 1900. The carriage from which they pulled a traveller is on display in Nairobi Railway Museum. Tsavo-West has important historic connections as a major battleground in World War I where British and Germany troops battled for supremacy The park is easy to reach, located off the main Nairobi-Mombasa road.It offers tremendous views with diverse habitats ranging from mountains, river forest, plains, lakes and wooded grassland. Its plains border with Tanzania. Game includes: leopard, cheetah, buffalo, black rhino, elephant, giraffe, lesser kudu, waterbuck, eland, gerenuk, impala, zebra, lion, plains game, crocodile and small mammals including mongoose, hyrax, dik dik and the nocturnal porcupine. Birdlife is legion and the visitor is constantly meeting with new species. One of the most conspicuous is the white-headed buffalo weaver, brownish-black and white with a vivid red rump when it flies. Starlings are numerous including the rare but duller Fischer's starling, hornbills are also prevalent. Birds of prey include, bustards, sunbirds and weaver-birds are well represented. Whole nesting birds include parrots, barbets and rollers. It is an excellent park for visitors who enjoy walking, offering a number of nature trails and the opportunity to explore the Chaimu volcanic crater and guides are available. Mzima Springs is a star attraction, a pool of natural spring water with underwater viewing hides for observing hippos. Accommodation: three lodges inside the park (total 276 beds), four tented lodges (total 154 beds), three public campsites and one special campsite (advance booking required) and three self-help banda sites (total 72 beds).

     

    Tsavo East National Park

     

    Tsavo East covers a bigger area (nearly 12,000 sq km compared to 9,000 sq km), and is even wilder than its neighbor. Much of it is covered with dense seas of thorn bush and crisscrossed with laterite game trails whose red dust gives Tsavo’s elephants their distinctive color. Most of the game in this arid country is found wherever there is water, such as around the Aruba Dam and the Kanderi Swamps near Voi Safari Lodge, which offers sweeping views across the park. Tsavo East National Park is one of the oldest and largest parks in Kenya at 11,747 square kilometers. Opened in April 1948, it is located near the village of Voi in the Taita-Taveta District of Coast Province. The park is divided into east and west sections by the A109 road and a railway. Named for the Tsavo River, which flows west to east through the national park, it borders the Chyulu Hills National Park, and the Mkomazi Game Reserve in Tanzania.

     

    The park can be accessed by three main gates, from Voi through the Manyani gate, from Mombasa through the Bachuma gate or from Malindi through the Sala gate. There are also several airstrips in the park that allow chartered light planes. Inside the park, the Athi and Tsavo rivers converge to form the Galana River. Most of the park consists of semi-arid grasslands and savanna. It is considered one of the world's biodiversity strongholds, and its popularity is mostly due to the vast amounts of diverse wildlife that can be seen, including the famous 'big five' consisting of masai lion,black rhino, cape buffalo, elephant and leopard. The park also is also home to a great variety of bird life such as the black kite, crowned crane, lovebird and the sacred ibis. The slightly larger Tsavo East is generally flat, with dry plains across which the Galana River flows. Other features include the Yatta Plateau and Lugard Falls. Tsavo West National Park is more mountainous and wetter than its counterpart, with swamps, Lake Jipe and the Mzima Springs. It is known for birdlife and for its large mammals. It is also home to a black rhino sanctuary. Although a few Early Stone Age and Middle Stone Age archaeological sites are recorded from ground surface finds in Tsavo, there is much evidence for thriving Late Stone Age economy from 6,000 to 1,300 years ago. Research has shown that Late Stone Age archaeological sites are found close to the Galana River in high numbers.

     

    The inhabitants of these sites hunted wild animals, fished and kept domesticated animals. Because of the sparse availability of water away from the Galana River, human settlement in Tsavo focused on the riparian areas and in rockshelters as one moves west. Swahili merchants traded with the inhabitants of Tsavo for ivory, catskins, and probably slaves as early as 700 AD (and probably earlier). There is no evidence for direct Swahili "colonization" of Tsavo. Instead, trade was probably accomplished by moving goods to and from the Swahili Coast via extended kin-networks. Trade goods such as cowry shells and beads have been recovered from archaeological sites dating to the early Swahili period. 19th century British and German explorers document people we now refer to as Orma and Waata during their travels through the "nyika," and generally viewed them as hostile toward their interests. Beginning in the late 19th/early 20th century, the British began a concerted effort to colonise the interior of Kenya and built a railway through Tsavo in 1898. Legend has it that "man-eating lions" terrorized the construction crews, however modern scholarship attributes the Waata for kidnapping and killing Indian and British labourers in an attempt to stop the unwanted intrusion into their territory. Inevitably, the British colonial authority bolstered security for the construction effort and the railway was built. Tsavo remained the homeland for Orma and Maasai pastoralists and Waata hunter-gatherers until 1948, when it was gazetted a national park. At that time, the indigenous populations were relocated to Voi and Mtito Andei as well as other locations within the nearby Taita Hills. Following Kenyan independence in 1963, hunting was banned in the park and management of Tsavo was turned over to the authority that eventually became the Kenya Wildlife Service. Tsavo currently attracts photo-tourists from all over the world interested in experiencing the vastness of the wilderness and incredible terrain.

     

    What to see and do

     

    Aruba Dam Aruba Dam is an 85-hectare man-made dam built by the Parks authorities in 1952 to staunch the waters of the seasonal Voi River, which flows down from the Taita Hills in the southwest. It usually holds water throughout the year and is frequented by huge numbers of ibis, many grey heron and a kaleidoscope of other water birds. It is also part of the territory of a large pride of lion, which can often be seen in the dam's vicinity.

     

    Kanderi Swamp The Kanderi Swamp lies near Voi Gate and during the dry months provides one of only two drinking areas in Tsavo East, thus attracting large herds of buffalo, impala and antelopes as well as yellow baboons and lion.

     

    Mudanda Rock Kenya's answer to Ayer's Rock of Australia is called Mudanda Rock, a massive 1.5km whale-backed rock which rears out of the shrub between Manyani Gate and Voi and is famous for its photo-opportunities, offering marvellous light, panoramic vistas and an excellent chance of prime wildlife shots. It is also an excellent vantage point from which to look down on the natural dam below, which can at times attract hundreds of elephant. This area is also known as a favourite leopard haunt, though daytime sightings are rare.

     

    The Galana River The Tsavo and Athi Rivers join above Lugard's Falls to form the Galana River, which then flows down to the Indian Ocean. A major feature of the park, the serpentine reaches of this river are fringed by riverine forests dominated by Acacia elatior, the Doum Palm Hyphaene compressa and the shrub Suaeda monoica.

     

    Lugard's Falls Named after Britain's first proconsul in East Africa, Captain (later Lord) Lugard, the falls are better described as rapids than falls progressing from foaming cataracts to narrow cascades that gouge deep into the gneiss bedrock creating fantastic shapes that have been surreally rounded by thousands of years of rushing water. Mighty when in full spate, the falls gush through a small fissure, narrow enough for the foolhardy to leap across, before plunging to the pool below, where massive crocodiles bask motionless in the sun. There is a parking area at the falls and visitors either climb around the bizarrely eroded rocks or walk down the river to view the rapids. 1km east of the falls another short diversion takes you to Crocodile Point where hippos and buffalo wallow and zip-jawed crocodile grin.

     

    The Yatta Plateau, an ancient valley frozen in time The Yatta plateau is a ridge or tongue of lava about 300km long and a maximum of 10km wide, which forms a seemingly never-ending backdrop to Tsavo East. One of the longest lava flows in the world, the Yatta affords fabulous views across the rolling reaches of the Park, is an ornithological paradise and makes a peerless sundowner or picnic spot. It is made up of a form of lava known as phonolite, which is between 11 and 13.6 million years old. Current thought suggests that the Yatta Plateau was formed when a stream of lava flowed across the land until it found its way into an ancient river valley. The lava then flowed down the valley; taking on the shape of its contours, until eventually it cooled and solidified. Thereafter the surrounding land was gradually lowered by erosion leaving the frozen river of lava standing up as a ridge

     

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